Amaranth Arts

European Vulture, Oddities Collector, Tree Hugger, Henna Artist, Craft Lady

oakheartcollective:

OAKHEART COLLECTIVE GIVEAWAY
It’s our 1 year birthday (well, we’re a little late but whatever) and this is a thank you for all the wonderful support we’ve gotten in the past year. Ya’ll kick ass.

Rules: You gotta reblog this post AND be following OakheartCollective. (We will check!) You can reblog as many times as you want!

Draw Date: August 1st 2014. We will be picking randomly, so make sure to keep your “ask” box open, or check our tumblr on that date! 

What you get: 
 15% off code for All We’ve Got Records
◊ 4 illustrated postcards by Aiden, Cud, Devon & Julie
◊ A handful of assorted stickers (we didn’t make them, but they’re cool!)
◊ 10 screenprinted patches from our Etsy store:
• Big Owl & Rabbit back patch
 Watership Down rabbit back patch
 "Take Care" garlic patch
 Brew not bombs patch
 Bird Skulls patch
 little Moth patch
 Geometric Bird patch
 Raven feather patch
 little feather patch (not available online)
 Oakheart swag patch (not available online either)
+ all of this comes in pretty silkscreened packaging.

Also, we have a facebook page where we post stuff, but that has nothing to do with the giveaway. But check it out if you want. Cheers!

inthecreek:

biologizeable:

ktsaurusr3x:

gardenawayideas:

Help save the honey bees! Please reblog and share :)

I’m very skeptical about this. Last I’ve heard, CCD is caused by a combination of factors, and to blindly point a finger at one source without references just ticks my bullshit meter. Anyone got science to back this up?

I checked out this page on the Ontario Beekeeper’s Association website, and found a couple of recent papers on the subject (though, granted, they are against the use of neonicotinoid, so it might be a one-sided story). The general consensus seems to be (bee?) that sublethal doses of neonicotinoids cause changes in behavior and physiology which leads to colony collapse - immune suppression to make them more susceptible to disease, negative change in foraging behavior, abandonment of poisoned hives, etc - so, yes, it seems that it is a combination of factors, which are aggravated by pesticide poisoning.
Richard J Gill, Nigel E. Raine. Chronic impairment of bumblebee natural foraging behavious induced by sublethal pesticide exposure. Functional Ecology, British Ecological Society July 7, 2014 
Chensheng Lu, Kenneth M. Warchol, Richard A. Callahan Sublethal exposure to neonicotinoids impaired honey bees winterization before proceeding to colony collapse disorder. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health. Bulletin of Insectology 2014
Dave Goulson An overview of the environmental risks posed by neonicotinoid pesticides. Journal of Applied Ecology 2013
Jeroen P VanderSluijs, Noa Simon-Delso, Dave Goulson, Laura Maxim, Jean-MarcBonmatin, Luc P. Belzunes Neonicotinoids, bee disorders and the sustainability of pollinator services Current Opinion Environmental Sustainability 2013
Rosemary Mason, Henk Tennekes, Francisco Sanchez-Bayo Immune Suppression by Neonicotinoid Insecticides at the Root of Global Wildlife Declines. Journal of Environmental Immunology. 2013

Important topic. Nice background research. Excellent punmanship.

inthecreek:

biologizeable:

ktsaurusr3x:

gardenawayideas:

Help save the honey bees! Please reblog and share :)

I’m very skeptical about this. Last I’ve heard, CCD is caused by a combination of factors, and to blindly point a finger at one source without references just ticks my bullshit meter. Anyone got science to back this up?

I checked out this page on the Ontario Beekeeper’s Association website, and found a couple of recent papers on the subject (though, granted, they are against the use of neonicotinoid, so it might be a one-sided story). The general consensus seems to be (bee?) that sublethal doses of neonicotinoids cause changes in behavior and physiology which leads to colony collapse - immune suppression to make them more susceptible to disease, negative change in foraging behavior, abandonment of poisoned hives, etc - so, yes, it seems that it is a combination of factors, which are aggravated by pesticide poisoning.

Richard J Gill, Nigel E. Raine. Chronic impairment of bumblebee natural foraging behavious induced by sublethal pesticide exposure. Functional Ecology, British Ecological Society July 7, 2014 

Chensheng Lu, Kenneth M. Warchol, Richard A. Callahan Sublethal exposure to neonicotinoids impaired honey bees winterization before proceeding to colony collapse disorder. Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health. Bulletin of Insectology 2014

Dave Goulson An overview of the environmental risks posed by neonicotinoid pesticides. Journal of Applied Ecology 2013

Jeroen P VanderSluijs, Noa Simon-Delso, Dave Goulson, Laura Maxim, Jean-MarcBonmatin, Luc P. Belzunes Neonicotinoids, bee disorders and the sustainability of pollinator services Current Opinion Environmental Sustainability 2013

Rosemary Mason, Henk Tennekes, Francisco Sanchez-Bayo Immune Suppression by Neonicotinoid Insecticides at the Root of Global Wildlife Declines. Journal of Environmental Immunology. 2013

Important topic. Nice background research. Excellent punmanship.

(via amslammin)

beautifulpicturesofhealthyfood:

How To Make Naturally Flavored Water

Supplies needed:

Fruit – Whatever kind you like (except bananas); make sure it’s good and ripe for maximum sweetness and flavor. Use all kinds of citrus and berries. Pineapple and watermelon work well for flavoring water. 

Herbs – These are optional, but many herbs are a surprising complement to fruit flavors; almost any herb will work depending on your personal preference

Jars or pitchers – Use 2 quart mason jars primarily, but any 2 quart pitcher will do. Fruit infusion pitcher is another option if you think you’ll be making infused waters regulary; a very easy, tidy way to strain fruit from water.

Muddler or wooden spoon for mashing fruit and herbs

Ice

Water – Use filtered water, but regular tap water is fine if it is hygienic.

Continue reading…

(via olive-elf)